Art Installation Unveiling and Dedication Commemorates Historical Grape Vine Prairie Peace Circle Meeting

Artwork by Linda Lewis depicts Sam Houston meeting with Tribes on the Grape Vine Prairie in Texas.The art installation dedication will consist of representatives from Tribal nations represented, the Sam Houston Memorial Museum and members of the advisory committee. 

Grapevine, TX — The Grapevine Convention & Visitors Bureau will soon be unveiling the “Peace Circle” public art installation, an interpretation of the meeting of Republic of Texas President Sam Houston and 10 American Indian chiefs which took place on the Grape Vine Prairie of Texas in 1843. Sam Houston and the Tribal leaders met in a spirit of friendship, peace, hope and trust in an effort to establish a place – a line that would not be crossed – where the Tribes could live in peace. The Peace Circle meeting later lead to the signing of the Treaty of Bird’s Fort on September 29, 1843.

The installation features 11 bronze statues standing 1.25 times life size, representing Republic of Texas President Sam Houston and American Indian chiefs from the Delaware, Chickasaw, Waco, Tawakoni, Keechi, Caddo, Anadarko, Ioni, Biloxi and Cherokee nations.

The City of Grapevine, Texas commissioned Grapevine artist-in-residence Linda Lewis to recreate the moment of this historic meeting on the Grape Vine Prairie.

Lewis, along with members of the Peace Circle Advisory Committee, thoroughly researched Sam Houston and the American Indian representations to ensure their accuracy. The statue of Sam Houston depicts him as he was dressed in that final meeting – wearing his velvet, fox-embroidered suit, his silver spurs and an Indian blanket thrown over his shoulders. Each chief’s physical attributes and the finest details of their 1843 clothing were developed from consulting Tribal members, studying photographs, paintings and/or relatives to ensure that the representations are accurate to each Tribe. This information has been approved by the Tribal nations they represent. The installation will be placed near the intersection of Main Street and Dallas Road in Historic Downtown Grapevine.

The art installation dedication will consist of representatives from the Tribal nations, the Sam Houston Memorial Museum and members of the advisory committee. Though the Comanches were invited but did not attend the original Peace Circle meeting on the Grape Vine Prairie, they will be attending the “Peace Circle” unveiling ceremony.

Some of the dedication events will include Comanche drum songs led by June Sovo, Comanche Nation; Sia Eagle display and presentation by co-founder Bill Volker, Comanche Nation; the “Wyandotte Thanksgiving Address,” the words before all else, shared by Sallie Cotter Andrews, Wyandotte Nation; a Blessing ceremony by Eddie Sandoval, Apache Nation; presentation of the American, Texas and Tribal flags with a Comanche flag song and more.

WHEN: Saturday, September 18 Dedication Ceremony from approximately 1 p.m. – 2 p.m. with festivities from 2 p.m. – 5 p.m. during the 35th Annual GrapeFest® – A Texas Wine Experience, presented by Bank of the West
 
WHERE: Peace Plaza at Grapevine Main Station, located at 815 S. Main St.

PEACE CIRCLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE:
Paul W. McCallum, Executive Director, Grapevine Convention & Visitors Bureau; Dr. Sam Haynes, Professor and Director, Center for Greater Southwestern Studies, The University of Texas at Arlington; Matt Reed, Pawnee Nation, Pawnee, Oklahoma; Eddie Sandoval, Apache Nation, Fort Worth; Leslie Thunderhawk, Rosebud Sioux Nation, Duncanville; Sallie Cotter Andrews, Wyandotte Nation, Grapevine Convention & Visitors Bureau; Cody Jolliff, Grapevine Convention & Visitors Bureau; and Linda Lewis, Artist, Grapevine Foundry.

INDIAN NATIONS ADVISORS:
Delaware Nation, Sonnie Allen; Chickasaw Nation, Laura A. Stewart; Wichita and Affiliated Tribes, Gary McAdams; Caddo Nation, Derek Hill; Tunica-Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana, John Barbry; Cherokee Nation, Elizabeth Toombs; Mount Tabor Indian Community, Rusk County, J. C. Thompson.

ABOUT THE ARTIST
Grapevine artist-in-residence, Linda Lewis, born in Lubbock, Texas, received her art education in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Utilizing detailed research by the Peace Circle Advisory Committee, Lewis has created and overseen the production of “Peace Circle” at the Grapevine Foundry located in the Cotton Belt Railroad Historic District, 701 S. Main St. For more than five years, she has been the owner/operator of the Grapevine Foundry and Fine Arts Program, bringing two decades of experience working with bronze to Main Street. She also is an art instructor, does mold making, wax working, sand blasting, bronze casting, welding and patina finishing.

ABOUT GRAPEVINE, TEXAS
Historic Grapevine, Texas, centrally located between Dallas and Fort Worth, is the premier go-to destination when planning a getaway or vacation in North Texas! Step back in time on Historic Downtown Main Street with a collection of charming boutiques, art galleries and bistros and cafes. Enjoy fantastic hotels and resorts, great attractions for the entire family, a wide variety of outdoor recreational activities, exquisite winery tasting rooms, world-class shopping and much more. For more information, visit GrapevineTexasUSA.com.

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Carmen Davis - Founder, Publisher and Executive Editor

Mrs. Davis is the founder, publisher and executive editor of the only Native American wholly owned and operated national tribal business publication, Native Business Magazine, and the producer of the annual and nationally attended Native Business Summit.

Mrs. Davis is also president of Davis Strategy Group has over 23 years of service to Indian Country and as an entrepreneur she has successfully established, operated, managed and grown several businesses in multiple sectors. She is equal parts a strategic visionary and behind-the-scenes implementor, essential in guiding and overseeing every process of brand development, business expansion, nation-to-nation relationship building and more.

She was named in 2009 as one of the first recipients of the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development’s, “40 Under 40” award which recognizes up and coming community and business leaders from across Indian Country.

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